press

2017: The Herald Interview, September

2017: Radio New Zealand Interview with Jim Mora, September

2017: Mac&Mae interview, October

2017: The Wireless Interview, September

2017: The Big Idea Interview, September

2017: Houses Magazine Culture Feature, September

2017: Mindfood Magazine Culture Feature, August.

2017: Habitus Living Artist Feature, July.

2016: NZ Herald review by T.J Macnamara

“The impact of the exhibition when first stepping into the gallery is striking, and there is a sense of an intense urge to engage with the traditional possibilities of paint.”

2016: Huffington Post interview with arts writer and critic John Seed

2016: Interview with Federica Tattoli, editor in chief of Fruit of The Forest, an Italian interdisciplinary arts magazine.

2016: NZHG Article Art Collector Alert: Here are five kiwi artists who are going places

“…the subjects struggle to emerge from great slathers of oil paint. His works seem abstract at first glance, then not quite so, and then the face of a man or woman suddenly appears as if by magic.

Once seen the face will never disappear, but the viewer may still marvel at the dynamic paint and unexpected colour conjunctions. In his most recent work Trolove has abandoned brushes and used only palette knives, so the mood of the final image is established by just a few smears of paint.”

2016: Denizen Magazine culture profile and ‘Young Artists to Watch’ feature, June

2016: Featured Artist profile by Warwick Brown in NZ H&G, June

2016: GayNZ article by Sarah Murphy 

 2015: Review by Amy Stewart

“Getting up close also allows the viewer a closer look at Trolove’s sheer skill – his colour placement is sensitive and deft, uncanny in its deliberateness. Importantly, his portraits show colours, depth, that are not immediately visible; he paints identities that are not fixed.

Trolove’s technique allows him to paint between things, specifically between the exterior and the interior of people. The dynamism of his paint application gives a sense of movement and flux without rendering the subject unstable, in fact quite the opposite – they appear more balanced and complete in his renderings.”

2015: The Opposite of Selfies by Tulia Thompson

“Trolove’s portraits have an expressionist quality; visceral brushstrokes of warm oranges and aqua blues across skin brought Toss Woollaston’s Southern landscapes to my mind. The potency of the portraits is in their ambiguity; the way their expressions hint at stories but the paintings leave enough space for an interpretive viewer.

What struck me about the paintings was their intimacy, and what they reveal about the self. Close-up, sometimes sleeping, sometimes uncomfortable or pensive, these are expressions and moments we don’t often see except for on the faces of lovers or spouses. These strangers have an intensified proximity to us, without the scaffolding we are used to in public spaces.

Trolove’s paintings are the opposite of ‘selfies’. Without any adornment, they reveal bodies we don’t show to the world; bodies in pain, in idle moments, or bodies that resist easy recognisability.”

2010: Review in Eye Contact by Mark Amery

“This installation has been well thought out as to all the materials used. I like its openness and the way it sidesteps being polemical, whilst still provoking a response.”

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